How to Monitor Network Traffic in Linux

by Jason Spidle

A wide variety of Linux networking monitoring tools can provide whatever functionality you require. From very basic graphical user interfaces that will provide you with general information about network activity to command line driven tools that almost infinite data, all of these network monitoring tools are available for free and relatively easy to set up. Once you have the network monitor of your choice installed, keeping tabs on how your bandwidth is used and by which programs is a cinch.

ntop

1

Launch Terminal by selecting “Applications,” then “Accessories,” then “Terminal.”

2

Install ntop by typing the following command and then pressing “Enter” (you may need to enter your administrative password to proceed): sudo apt-get ntop

3

Grant ntop administrative rights so that it is able to monitor network traffic by entering the following command in Terminal: ntop -A

4

Launch the default ntop monitoring interface by entering the following command in Terminal: ntop

IPTraf

1

Launch Terminal by selecting “Applications,” then “Accessories,” then “Terminal.”

2

Install IPTraf by entering the following command in Terminal: sudo apt-get iptraf

3

Launch IPTraf by entering the following command in Terminal: iptraf

vnStat

1

Launch Terminal by selecting “Applications,” then “Accessories,” then “Terminal.”

2

Install vnStat by entering the following command in Terminal: sudo apt-get vnStat

3

Launch vnStat by entering the following command in Terminal: vnstat

About the Author

Jason Spidle is a technology enthusiast and writer. His writing on computers, smartphones, Web design, Internet applications, sports and music has been published at a variety of websites including Salon, JunkMedia, Killed in Cars and The Columbia Free Times. Spidle maintains a number of blogs featuring poetry, short stories and other fiction.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Jack Hollingsworth/Photodisc/Getty Images