Instructions for a Motorola H685 Bluetooth Headset

by Ben David

The Motorola H685 Bluetooth headset is part of the Motorola H600 series of Bluetooth headsets and share the same features and functions as the H680 and H681 models, differing only in model number due to changes in their manufacturing process. The H685 is designed to accommodate wireless connections of up to 33 feet between the device and the phone or any other device that it is being paired with. The operation of the Motorola H685 is fairly straightforward and very user-friendly.

Setup an Pairing

Plug the Motorola H685 charger cord into the port on the back of the charger case and the other end into an outlet. Place the H685 headset onto the charging case with the charging contacts on the headset aligned with the charging case contacts. The indicator light will turn red while the device is charging and turn off when the device is fully charged. When the device is fully charged, remove it from the charger case.

Slide the "Power" switch on the side of the H685 headset to "On." The indicator light on the device will be lit in a steady blue to show that the device is ready for pairing with your phone.

Initiate a pairing link with the H685 headset through your phone using its Bluetooth settings. The process for this varies from phone to phone, but normally involves going through the phone's menu and turning on the Bluetooth link. This will bring up a list of devices that are available for the phone to link or pair with. Select the Motorola H685 headset from the list and enter "0000" as the passkey if prompted to do so.

Making Calls

Tap the "Call" button on the side of the headset to receive a call and to end a call.

Tap both "Volume" buttons on the top and bottom of the headset to mute or un-mute a call in progress.

Press and hold a "Volume" button until you hear two descending tones to reject a call.

Press and hold the "Call" button until you hear two ascending tones to redial the last call.

Tap the "Call" button and speak the name after the tone to make a voice dial call.

Items you will need

About the Author

Based in New York City, Ben David has been a writer since 2006. His expertise extends into the fields of business administration, new media technologies, consumer electronics and mobile device technology and design. David studied Communications at Howard University.