Ways to Copy and Paste a Password

by Steven Surman

As the importance of technology increases in daily life, so does the need for security to protect against electronic wrongdoing. Because of this, more and more websites and computer programs are requiring complex passwords to protect digital information from offenders. If you have more than one password, it might be difficult to keep them all properly sorted in your memory. There are methods to copying and pasting passwords so you can keep your login information organized.

Text Documents

One method you can use to copy and paste a password is to retrieve it from a private text document to which only you have access. You can use a program like Notepad or Microsoft Word to accomplish this, in which you'll list your password or passwords. But be sure to label them so you know what each one is used for. When you're ready to use one of your passwords, highlight it, right click, and select the "Copy" option. Then select the password field, right click, select "Paste," and your password will appear. You can also use "Ctrl" and "C" to copy, and "Ctrl" and "V" to paste.

Email Messages

You can also send an email message to yourself containing your password(s) and then store the message in your mail archives. That way, you'll always have access to them so long as you have access to the Internet. You can use the same commands mentioned above to copy and paste.

Web Browsers

Some web browsers give you the option to store your passwords on your computer. A browser like Mozilla Firefox includes a feature called the "password manager," which provides you with the option to retain each password you use on their respective sites. That way, if you use different passwords for different sites, each individual site will remember the specific password you've used in the past. You can also turn off this feature, clear its history bank and make site adjustments whenever your want---completely cutting out the need for tedious copying and pasting.

About the Author

Steven Surman has been a freelance writer and journalist since 2007. His work has appeared in several magazines, including “The Humanist” and “A&U.” He is also a staff writer for the Broken Frontier website. Surman holds a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and English from Bloomsburg University.

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