How to Use Microsoft Word to Type a Legal Form

by Kevin Lee

Legal forms are sometimes challenging to create from scratch. Some forms, for example, may contain complex layouts that you may not have the publishing skills to produce. Microsoft solves this problem by including templates with Word. A template is a pre-built framework of a document that lets you fill in the blanks. If you cannot find a template that you need in your local version of Word, you can download one from their website.

1

Open MIcrosoft Word.

2

Click "File" if you use Word 2010. Otherwise, click the "Office" botton at the top of the Word window. The "Available Templates" window will open.

3

Type "Legal" in the "Search Office.com for templates" text box.and press "Enter." Word will display a list of legal templates. Each template has a thumbnail image and a title, such as "Legal Sheet."

4

Browse through the templates and click the ones that interest you. Larger views of the template will appear on the right of the window as you click the thumbnails.

5

Click "Download" when you find the legal template that you want to use. If Word displays a message about "Genuine Microsoft Office," click "Continue." Word will retrieve the template and display it in the editing window.

6

Review the template. The legal form may have headings, tables and other elements that you would find on a legal form. It may also contain sample text. Delete the sample text, then fill out the form using your own information.

7

Press "CTRL+S" when you are done. The "Save As" window will open. Enter a name for the legal form in the "FIle Name" text box and click "Save."

Tip

  • After downloading the legal template, it will exist in your list of available templates. To use it again, double-click "My Templates" on the "Available Templates" screen and then double-click the template that you downloaded.

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About the Author

After majoring in physics, Kevin Lee began writing professionally in 1989 when, as a software developer, he also created technical articles for the Johnson Space Center. Today this urban Texas cowboy continues to crank out high-quality software as well as non-technical articles covering a multitude of diverse topics ranging from gaming to current affairs.

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