How to Use a Computer As an EVP Recorder

by Quinn Marshall

EVP stands for "electronic voice phenomena." It is a term often used by ghost hunters to describe voices picked up during a recording that weren't spoken by any living person. You can purchase a quality recording device created specifically for detecting EVPs, but they are expensive and may be beyond the budget of amateur ghost hunters. Fortunately, you can use your computer, such as a portable laptop, in conjunction with a microphone as an EVP device.

Step 1

Purchase a light, portable laptop if possible. A desktop computer is severely limited in its function as an EVP recorder due to its stationary design; you'll have to set it up in a single spot and hope it detects the audio you need. A light laptop such as a netbook, on the other hand, can be packed up quickly and moved from location to location with minimal effort.

Step 2

Purchase a high-quality microphone, which is the most essential part of any EVP recorder. Ideally you want a bi-directional microphone, which is a microphone that records audio from multiple directions at once. You can use your laptop's built-in microphone if it has one, but you'll pick up noises from inside the computer, such as the spinning fan and hard drive, and will receive poor recordings.

Step 3

Click "Start," then type "Sound Recorder" into the search field. Press "Enter." Windows' native sound recording app will open. Plug the microphone into your computer's "Microphone" or "Line-in" port. Position the microphone wherever you'd like it, then press the red "Record" button on Sound Recorder.

Press the "Stop" button on Sound Recorder when you are finished recording. A "Save" window will appear automatically. Enter a descriptive file name, such as "Prison Recording 1_2011 11PM," then click "Save." The audio file will be saved for you to review at a later time, upload to ghost hunting websites or edit using audio editing software.

References

About the Author

Based in New England, Quinn Marshall began her writing career in 2004. She was a featured writer for Laptop Logic and contributes to publications such as "Smashing Magazine."

More Articles

×