How to Upload GPX Files to a TomTom One

by Fred Decker

Although mapping coordinates are universal and GPS satellites can be used anywhere in the world, it's often difficult to exchange information between different platforms. Garmin, TomTom and other GPS manufacturers each organize data in their own proprietary formats. This presents an obstacle for travelers or geocaching enthusiasts who want to share information with their friends. However, it is possible to convert a Garmin GPX file to TomTom's OV2 waypoint format or ITN itinerary format using third-party utilities.

Conversion with Extra POI Editor

1

Navigate to the online POI editor on the GPS Data Team's website (see Resources).

2

Click the "Choose File" button. Use the popup window to browse for the GPX file you want to convert, then click "Open."

3

Look at the top right corner of the POI Editor screen. You'll see the filename you've chosen, with a drop-down menu listing a range of possible file formats for saving and conversion. Scroll down the list and select TomTom's OV2 format.

4

Click "Save" to save the file.

Conversion With ITN Converter

1

Download ITN Converter from the Benichou Software website (see Resources). Run the installer and follow the onscreen prompts to install the program. When the installation is finished, the program runs.

2

Click the "Open" button near the top right of the program's startup dialog box. Browse for the GPX file you wish to convert and click "Open" again to load the file.

3

Look for the "Export Filetype" drop-down menu at the bottom of the dialog box. Click it and select TomTom's ITN itinerary format. Click "Export" to convert the file.

Conversion Using GPSBabel

1

Go to GPSBabel's download page (see Resources) and click the appropriate download button for your computer and operating system. Install the software following the installer's prompts. When it's finished, the program runs.

2

Click the pull-down "Format" menu at the top of the screen in the Input section and select "GPX/XML."

3

Click "File Name(s)" and use the pop-up window to locate your GPX file. Click "Open."

4

Pull down the "Format" menu in the lower Output half of the screen and scroll down to "TomTom Itineraries (.itn)" if you wish to use the file as an itinerary or "TomTom POI file (.ov2)," if you want to use it as a waypoints/points of interest file.

5

Click "File Name" and use the drop-down menu to navigate to the folder where you'd like to save the file. Type in a new filename or copy the old one, but change the file extension from GPX to either ITN or OV2, whichever corresponds to the format you chose in the previous step. Click "Save."

6

Finish the conversion by clicking the "Apply" button in the lower right corner of your screen.

Transferring the File

1

Connect your TomTom One to the computer using the supplied USB cable. TomTom Home runs automatically.

2

Click "Install to TomTom," then click "My Computer."

3

Select your converted ITN or OV2 file by clicking in the check box next to the filename.

4

Click "Install." TomTom Home transfers the new itinerary or POI file to your TomTom One. Click the "My Device" icon in the lower left corner of your TomTom Home screen. The program tells you when you can safely unplug your device.

Tips

  • File conversion programs including Extra POI Editor and ITN converter offer the option of manually editing your GPX file before you change formats. You might find some features or functions are easier to use in the conversion programs than in TomTom Home itself.
  • GPSBabel supports Ubuntu and other popular Linux versions, as well as Windows and Macintosh. Tech-savvy users can use GPSBabel to efficiently convert GPX files to ITN or OV2 format from the Windows or Linux command line, without using the menu-driven interface.

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About the Author

Fred Decker is a trained chef and certified food-safety trainer. Decker wrote for the Saint John, New Brunswick Telegraph-Journal, and has been published in Canada's Hospitality and Foodservice magazine. He's held positions selling computers, insurance and mutual funds, and was educated at Memorial University of Newfoundland and the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.

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