Is There Any Way to Receive Money Through PayPal Without Fees?

by Lee Appleyard ; Updated September 01, 2017

In this stressed economic day and age, it seems like we pay for many things through fees and hidden costs, including credit card interest rates and bank fees. However, there is some relief. While PayPal does charge fees for some of its transactions, most money transfers do not incur charges. You will be able to send, receive and withdraw money without incurring any fees.

Sending Money

If you want to send money to your friends and family, there are no fees involved when you use your PayPal balance or linked bank account as your funding source. All you need to do is select the "Send Money" tab, then choose the "Personal" tab. You have the option of making your payment as a Gift, Personal payment owed, Household expense or Other. Enter the recipient's email address and the amount you want to send. Click "Continue" and review your transaction. Click "Submit" to send the funds.

Receiving Money

As is the case with sending money from PayPal, you can also receive funds from someone with a PayPal balance or bank account. You will receive an email notification from PayPal informing you of the funds that have arrived into your account. These funds are instantly credited to your PayPal balance. There are no fees incurred for receiving these payments, and you can use these funds to send money through PayPal or to transfer to your linked bank account.

Withdrawing Money

If you withdraw money from your PayPal account, there is no charge to have it deposited into your linked bank account. However, there is a $1.50 fee to receive a check. Bear in mind that you will have to manually deposit those funds into your linked bank account.

Transfers

There are no fees to transfer money from your own linked bank account to your PayPal account or back again.

About the Author

Lee Appleyard has been a senior-level copywriter for more than 15 years. She has written and edited for technology and current-event magazines, including the "World and I" and "The Good Software Guide," as well as for major technology companies, a U.K. government-run business website, an international nursery retailer and a thyroid charity. Appleyard holds a B.S. in biology from Marywood University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera David Woolley/Lifesize/Getty Images