How to Test Your Camera for Skype

by Kefa Olang

Before making a video call in Skype, your webcam must be properly connected and configured to support video calls. Using Skype's program settings, you can verify your camera's status and make sure that Skype is able to detect it. Once verified, Skype provides options to enhance picture quality via settings such as brightness and contrast. After testing your camera and verifying a video connection, you can use your webcam to call family and friends.

1

Click the "Tools" button on the Skype menu bar and then click "Options" to bring up the program options.

2

Click the "Video Settings" link under General. You should see a live picture in the Webcam section if your camera is properly connected and working. Select a different camera from the Webcam drop-down list if you have more than one camera connected to your computer. If your webcam is not displaying live video, make sure it is connected to your computer and powered on. If you are using an external webcam, refer to the user manual for installation and setup information. If another program is using the camera, close it; only one application can use your webcam at a time.

3

Click the "Webcam Settings" button if you are now able to see live video, then use the sliders to adjust picture quality settings such as brightness and contrast.

4

Select a contact to call under the People or Favorites section when your camera is ready for use. The conversation window opens.

5

Tap or click the "Video Call" icon to start a video call. A call bar appears at the bottom of the conversation window and the phone rings. When your contact answers the video call, you should see each other.

6

Move the mouse to the bottom right of the screen and select "Settings" if you can't see or hear one another. Select "Options," then check and adjust your video and audio settings.

7

Click the "End Call" icon to end your video call.

Tip

  • Always use the latest version of Skype for best results.

Warning

  • The information in this article is for computers running Windows 8. Instructions for other versions of Windows may differ slightly or significantly.

About the Author

Kefa Olang has been writing articles online since April 2009. He has been published in the "Celebration of Young Poets" and has an associate degree in communication and media arts from Dutchess Community College, and a bachelor's degree in broadcasting and mass communication from the State University of New York, Oswego.

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