How to Tell If a Microchip Is ISO-Compliant?

by Kevin Mason ; Updated March 16, 2018

ISO is the International Organization for Standardization, and it is the largest publisher of standards worldwide, encompassing 163 countries. The ISO is a nongovernmental organization where committees agree upon the accepted standards. To achieve ISO standardization a product must go through several steps, including the proposal stage, preparatory stage, committee stage, inquiry stage, approval stage and publication stage. Standardization is especially important in electronics, due to the necessity of accuracy in manufacturing. With microchips, also known as ICs or integrated circuits, there is a simple process for determining if the IC meets the ISO standards.

Look for the serial number located on the top side of the microchip; an example of a serial number and manufacturer would be: PIC16F631 manufactured by the company “Microchip.” Sometimes it is difficult to read the specification number; in that case, try using a magnifying glass.

Find the data sheet for the specified product by searching for it on your preferred search engine. Download or open the data sheet that matches your product's specification number and manufacturer.

Read through the data sheet to find an ISO compliance number. An example of one would read as follows: “ISO/TS 16949:2002.” If you cannot find the ISO standard, the microchip may be listed through a different standards organization. However, most data sheets will tell you which standard the chip adheres to. To look into the standard further, go to the ISO website and look up the standardization number. There can be a fee to obtain documentation.

Items you will need

  • Computer with Internet connection

  • Magnifying glass

Tip

  • Be sure to ground yourself before opening a computer to examine components. Static electricity can damage electronics.

Tip

  • The ISO is not the only standards association for electronics. The IEEE Standards Association also offers guidelines.

Warning

  • Be sure to ground yourself before opening a computer to examine components. Static electricity can damage electronics.

Items you will need

About the Author

Kevin Mason has been writing professionally since 2010. His technical knowledge includes electronics, mathematics and computing. Mason holds a technical diploma in electrical and computer engineering from the British Columbian Institute of Technology.

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