How to Stop Voicemail on a Panasonic Cordless Phone

by Steve McDonnell

Your Panasonic cordless phone might come with a built-in answering machine. You can deactivate the answering machine either from the base unit, from a handset or remotely by dialing in to your phone. Once the answering machine has picked up a call, however, you cannot cancel it until you hang up or you reach the maximum message recording length. If your unit doesn't have an answering machine, then voice mail is provided by your telephone carrier, not by your Panasonic cordless phone.

1

Press the "Answer On/Off" button on the base unit of your Panasonic cordless phone until the Answer On/Off indicator light on the base unit is not illuminated to deactivate the answering machine feature on the phone.

2

Press "Menu" on a cordless handset, press "#328" and then press "Talk" to turn off the built-in answering machine functionality if you don't have easy access to the base unit. Verify that the Answer On/Off indicator light on the base unit is not illuminated when you next have access to it.

3

Dial your phone number, enter your remote access code after the greeting message begins and then press "0" at the voice prompt to turn off the answering machine functionality when accessing your Panasonic cordless phone remotely.

Tip

  • If you want to stop voice mail on your Panasonic phone and not the built-in answering machine, you must ask your telephone service provider to cancel the voice mail service on your telephone line.

Warning

  • If you pick up your phone after the answering machine greeting has already started, you cannot cancel the answering machine. Wait until the greeting ends and the beep sounds. You can speak with the other person on the phone, but the first few minutes of your conversation will be recorded on the answering machine.

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About the Author

Steve McDonnell's experience running businesses and launching companies complements his technical expertise in information, technology and human resources. He earned a degree in computer science from Dartmouth College, served on the WorldatWork editorial board, blogged for the Spotfire Business Intelligence blog and has published books and book chapters for International Human Resource Information Management and Westlaw.

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