How to Set Up an FM Antenna

by Elton Dunn

Getting radio frequency can be tricky if you live far from a radio tower. If you're having trouble hearing your favorite stations, consider getting an FM antenna so you can get those stations loud and clear. You can find antennas at electronics stores. Setting them up will vary slightly by model, but the basic process is the same. Always read your instructions before starting to familiarize yourself with the parts included in your antenna kit.

Connect your radio to your antenna. Depending on your antenna model, there are a number of ways to do this. You may slide the F-connector port into the radio's antenna input terminal or you may wind the cords of a transformer around the radio's FM terminal. Your antenna model will provide exact instructions for your model.

Insert the small end of the AC adapter into the FM antenna. Then insert the other end of the AC adapter into an outlet.

Set the FM radio to a frequency near 98 MHz. Hold the FM antenna in your hands and move it around until you get the best reception so you know where to put it.

Set the FM radio to a frequency near 88 MHz and move it around to determine where the signal is clearest. Note this location. Then move the dial to 108 MHz and move the antenna around, then note the location where this frequency comes in clearest.

Place the antenna on a stable, flat surface where it will receive good reception in most frequencies. Radio Shack recommends putting it as high as possible.

Mount the antenna on its stand so it remains stable. Turn the antenna upside down then slide the stand over the antenna body so their slots align. Push down as far as you can but make sure you don't squish the wires. Then turn the antenna right side up and place it down.

Tip

  • check Don't place your antenna near a refrigerator, water pipe or a metal surface. This will interrupt the frequency.

Items you will need

About the Author

A successful website writer since 1998, Elton Dunn has demonstrated experience with technology, information retrieval, usability and user experience, social media, cloud computing, and small business needs. Dunn holds a degree from UCSF and formerly worked as professional chef. Dunn has ghostwritten thousands of blog posts, newsletter articles, website copy, press releases and product descriptions. He specializes in developing informational articles on topics including food, nutrition, fitness, health and pets.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera radio image by Claudio Calcagno from Fotolia.com