How To Set Up a Second Router With Verizon FIOs

by Dean Lee

With Verizon FIOS, you are provided a modem/wireless router. However, if more than four people need to have a wired connection or if there are components that are not compatible with the wireless signal, it may be necessary to connect a second router. Connecting the second router is not difficult, but depending on the brand of the new router, it may cause IP conflicts with the FIOS router. An IP conflict is where two devices on the same network have the same network address. One way to fix this issue is to change the IP address on the new router so that it will work with the FIOS router.

Connect the Ethernet cable from the computer to one of the open LAN ports (one through four) on the FIOS router.

Click "Start," then "Run," and type in "cmd." Press "Enter" to open the command prompt.

Type "ipconfig," then press "Enter." Make note of the subnet mask and default gateway.

Disconnect the computer from the FIOS router.

Connect the Ethernet cable between an open LAN port (labeled one through four) on the second router and the computer.

Open a web browser and type the router interface address. The address is found in the router user manual and is often printed directly on the router. The format of the address is 192.168.X.X. Refer to the user manual if a login and password are required, but on many routers the default login is "admin" and the default password is "password."

Navigate to the IP Address section of the router interface. This is usually under "Basic Settings" or something similar.

Select the option to use a static IP address.

Type in 192.168.1.5 for the IP address. The five can be replaced with any number under 254.

Type in the information for the subnet mask and default gateway that was written down from the FIOS router, then click "Apply."

Disconnect the computer from the second Router, and power both the FIOS and second router down.

Connect the Ethernet cord from one of the four LAN ports on the FIOS router to the Internet/WAN port on the second router, then turn both routers on. The two routers should be working together now.

Items you will need

About the Author

Dean Lee began writing in 2008, with articles appearing on various websites. Lee is currently a network technician with both Cisco Certified Network Associate and Security+ certifications. Lee graduated from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Arts in economics and later completed a Master of Arts in communication at Regent University.

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