How to Get Scratches Off an iPhone

by Avery Martin

The iPhone has a reputation for easily getting scratches on the back of the device. Even when kept in a protective case, dust and other particles tend to get inside the case and scratch up the finish. While some people may recommend a very fine sandpaper to remove scratches, this often results in a dull finish. Restoring the original luster and shine of the back of your iPhone can be accomplished using an everyday household item -- toothpaste.

1

Turn your iPhone off by holding the lock button until the "Slide to Power Off" option appears. Then, slide the slider from left to right.

2

Place a pea-sized amount of toothpaste directly on the [iPhone case](https://society6.com/cases?utm_source=SFGHG&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=6571) backing.

3

Buff the back of the iPhone lightly using your microfiber cloth. Concentrate on the areas with scratches first and then proceed to buff the rest of the backing to ensure a consistent look.

4

Wait about two minutes and then spray glass cleaner along the back of the iPhone. Wipe the glass cleaner and toothpaste off using paper towels.

5

Complete the same process to clean the screen of your iPhone.

Tip

  • Use a protective screen guard to protect the glass on your iPhone.

Warnings

  • When removing scratches from your iPhone, be gentle since you can also remove the anti-scratch coating if you scrub too hard.
  • Do not use abrasive brass, plastic or silver cleaners. These cleaners typically strip the finish off of iPhones.
  • Avoid using this process to remove scratches too frequently. It's best to complete this process only when absolutely necessary.

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About the Author

Avery Martin holds a Bachelor of Music in opera performance and a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian studies. As a professional writer, she has written for Education.com, Samsung and IBM. Martin contributed English translations for a collection of Japanese poems by Misuzu Kaneko. She has worked as an educator in Japan, and she runs a private voice studio out of her home. She writes about education, music and travel.

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