How to Scan & Print Newspaper Pictures

by James Clark

Scanning and printing newspaper pictures can result in better prints than the original copy when digital imaging software is used. Scanned newspaper photos also last longer and are a better choice for keepsakes, such as a high school student's academic or athletic accomplishments, because newsprint fades and begins to yellow over time. A scanned picture stored on a computer remains as crisp and clear as the day it was printed in the paper.

Turn on the computer and the scanner, ensuring both are connected and ready. Launch the software that came with the scanner to view the newspaper pictures on the computer monitor as each is scanned.

Lift the cover on the scanner and place the photo to be scanned face down on the glass.

Close the cover and press the "Scan" button on the scanner control panel or click on the "Scan" button using the software that came with the scanner.

Click the "Save As" button on the scanner software when the scanned photo appears on the computer monitor. Open or create a new folder when the "Save" menu appears.

Choose a file name for the image and click "Save."

Launch digital imaging software, such as Adobe Photoshop, and open the scanned photo into the software.

Adjust the brightness, contrast, color and other characteristics of the photo to clean up and sharpen the scanned image using the digital imaging software.

Save the scanned photo again under a different name to distinguish between the original scanned image and the adjusted image. For example, a scanned photo named "John" might be adjusted and saved as a second copy with the name "John II."

Print the scanned photo by opening the imaging software and clicking on the photo to be printed. When the photo appears in the software, click "File" and then click "Print."

Select the printer to be used (a list of printers connected to the computer or on a network will appear) and click "OK."

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About the Author

James Clark began his career in 1985. He has written about electronics, appliance repair and outdoor topics for a variety of publications and websites. He has more than four years of experience in appliance and electrical repairs. Clark holds a bachelor's degree in political science.

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