Say Cheese: 9 iPhone Photo Accessories for Shutterbugs

by Jason Cipriani ; Updated September 19, 2017

They say that the best camera is the one you have with you. And since there's a really good chance that you have an iPhone in your pocket, here are some accessories that you can use to to enhance its capabilities as a camera.

Olloclip

The Olloclip takes the single fixed lens found on your iPhone, and adds as many as four more to it via a clip that slides over the corner of your device. By flipping over the Olloclip, you cab swap among a fisheye, wide-angle, and two macro lenses. Finally, you can get dramatically different, more SLR-like perspectives with your iPhone photos.

Related: Read more about Olloclip’s 4-in-1 lens.

Photojojo Lenses

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Photojojo offers its own set of lenses, similar to the ones you can get from Olloclip. But instead of locking you into using it with only an iPhone, the Photojojo lenses work on a broad range of other devices as well. You can order just one model, or get the entire set.

Related: Learn more about Photojojo’s lenses.

Glif

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A quick and convenient way to prop up your iPhone on a moment's notice comes in the form of the Glif. The Glif will hold your phone steady for a FaceTime call or even a group photo. And if that's not enough, you can use it in conjunction with a tripod for even more flexibility.

Related: Learn more about Glif

GorillaPod Magnetic

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Taking a long-exposure photo requires more than a steady hand -- it really begs for a tripod. Instead of lugging around a mount made for heavier cameras, get the Magnetic GorillaPod from Joby. It attaches to nearly anything using either its magnets or it’s bendable legs.

Related: Learn more about Joby’s GorillaPod Magnetic.

Apple headphones

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Remote shutter releases eliminate the finger shake that comes from pressing the shutter button. One thing most iPhone users don’t realize is that the Apple headphones (any set of headphones will do) act as a remote shutter release. Just plug them into your iPhone, launch the camera app, and press the volume up button on the headphones to take the shot.

Related: Learn more about Apple’s latest headphones.

Kogeto Dot

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The Dot makes it possible to shoot a 360-degree video in one go. Instead of having to splice together a photo on your computer, using this accessory and companion app, you can shoot and share videos that capture the entire world around you.

Related: Learn more about Dot.

Sony QX10 and QX100

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The photo quality of the iPhone is sufficient most of the time, but for some it’s not enough. Enter the Bluetooth camera from Sony. Using an app (and the module itself), you can take and transfer high-quality photos using your iPhone. You can then post and share the photos to your social networks.

Related: Learn more about the Sony QX10 and QX100

Daylight Viewfinder

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Trying to view the screen on your iPhone when the sun is glaring down on it is frankly impossible. Using the Daylight Viewfinder -- a gadget similar to that found on traditional cameras -- you’re able to view, focus, and snap a photo even in direct sunlight.

Related: Learn more about the Daylight Viewfinder.

Shutter by Muku Labs

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For those times when using tethered headphones as a shutter release just doesn’t work, here’s a true wireless remote control, in the form of a Bluetooth shutter release. Connect it to your iPhone, launch the Camera app, and press the shutter button to snap photos from across the room. Awesome.

Related: Learn more about Shutter.

About the Author

Jason Cipriani has been a technology writer since 2009. He offers daily tech tips on CNET, reviews new products on TechdadReview.com, serves as a weekly contributor to the "Pueblo Chieftain" newspaper and covers tech-related topics for "PULP" magazine.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Olloclip