How to Repair a Corrupt EXE File

by Krista Martin

An .exe file is an executable file that allows the programs on your desktop or laptop to work. In a sense, they execute the program or application and enable it to function the way we want it to. Even most websites contain .exe files in order to operate. Without .exe files your computer cannot function properly, and there are thousands of .exe files on your computer at any given time. If your .exe file is corrupt you will have to repair or replace them in order to get your operating system to properly function.

Find out what kind of .exe file is corrupted and download it again. For example, if your program installer is corrupted, you will need to download it from your Microsoft Windows XP CD.

Insert the CD into your CD-ROM.

Click "Start" and "Restart" to reboot your computer.

Press any key to activate the CD as the computer is loading up.

Select the "R" key on your keyboard to access the recovery console.

Select the operating system that needs to be repaired and enter the administrator password.

Type "Expand d:\i386/ntoskrnl.ex_ C:\Windows/System32".

Overwrite the "Y" file and press "Enter".

Type "Exit" to reboot and restart the computer.

Search the Microsoft website and look for the .exe file you wish to repair if you know which file it is or don't have the CD. The CD will restore all of your computer's .exe files, but this is a process you don't need to go through if you know specifically what you need to repair. Microsoft has specified different instructions for the many .exe files available. The instructions, however are very detailed, difficult and time-consuming.

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About the Author

Krista Martin has been writing professionally since 2005. She has written for magazines, newspapers and websites including Live Listings, "Homes & Living" magazine and the "Metro Newspaper." Martin holds an honors Bachelor of Arts in English from Memorial University of Newfoundland and a Master of Journalism from the University of Westminster.

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