How to Remove a Trailblazer Stereo

by Michael J. Scott

The first step in installing a new after-market stereo in your Chevrolet Trailblazer is to remove the factory stereo. There's no need to pay a car audio specialist to remove the stereo, as the process is straightforward and can be done in no time. Once the old stereo is removed, you can install a new stereo yourself, or take to someone else to have the new stereo installed. Make sure you have a socket wrench and socket set before proceeding.

Open your hood and disconnect the negative battery cable from the battery. Loosen the nut holding the cable in place and slide it off of the battery terminal.

Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the two screws along the top of the instrument panel. Remove another Phillips screw below the AC and heater controls, just to the left of the power outlet.

Remove the two 7mm bolts underneath the steering column, holding the lower trim panel in place. Once the nuts are removed, pull the panel out from under the steering column.

Remove the three Phillips screws along the bottom of the instrument panel. There are two on the left side of the steering column and one on the right side.

Use your fingers to gently pry loose the dash panel. The dash panel is held in place by plastic clips. Start on one side of the panel and pry it toward you. Work your way around the panel to disengage all of the clips. Once the panel has been freed, remove it and set it aside.

Remove the three 7mm bolts holding the stereo in place. Slide the stereo forward and disconnect the cables from the back of the stereo to remove it.

Warning

  • Always disconnect the battery when removing a stereo to avoid shorting out the stereo and shocking yourself.

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About the Author

Michael Scott is a freelance writer and professor of justice studies at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is a former prosecutor. Scott has a J.D. from Emory University and is a member of the Utah State Bar. He has been freelancing since June 2009, and his articles have been published on eHow.com and Travels.com.

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