How to Remove a Car Stereo Unit With DIN Tools

by Andy Warycka

At first glance it looks like the only way to get that stereo out of your car's dashboard is with a hammer and telekinesis. You can put the hammer away and stop trying to bend spoons, since there is a specialized tool for removing factory stereos, and they even come with many aftermarket installation kits. Called DIN tools or DIN keys, they are inexpensive, easy to use and you can even make your own if you need to.

Stereo Removal

1

Locate the holes on the front of the stereo. There are two on either side. These holes may be hidden behind flaps, tabs or small doors on the faceplate of the stereo.

2

Insert the DIN tools into the holes, one to each side, until you hear or feel a click, or until the tools cannot be pushed further.

3

Spread the tools apart slightly.

4

Grasping the DIN tools firmly, pull the stereo towards you, out of the dashboard.

Tips

  • If you don't have access to a pair of DIN tools or would rather not purchase any, a length of metal coat hanger bent in the correct ā€œUā€ shape will work just fine.
  • Some German cars require a different type of removal tool, one that is a piece of flat stock with a notch to release the holding springs. Others use small screws hidden behind the bezel. Consult your owner's manual if unsure of which type you have.
  • Aftermarket car stereos will come with their own removal tools. Keep these in a safe place if you intend to remove the stereo later.

Warnings

  • Always ensure the battery is disconnected before working on any electrical systems in your car.
  • Be careful not to break or damage any wires when removing the stereo from the dashboard.

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About the Author

Andy Warycka has been writing professionally since 2009. His work has appeared on sites such as SheKnows.com, Match.com, FindersFree.com and other top online properties. He owns a photography business, and holds an Associate of Applied Science in photography from the Rochester Institute of Technology.

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