How to Program an Audiovox Alarm Remote

by Robert Ceville

Programming an Audiovox alarm remote does not require taking your vehicle into a dealership or to an expensive technician. As long as you have your vehicle's key, you can do the programming on your own. You can program up to four remotes to the Audiovox car alarm's transceiver, using the method described in this tutorial. If you haven't ever programmed the remote before, do not feel overwhelmed. With the right instruction, you can do it in under five minutes.

Insert your car key into the ignition and turn the car "On." Then press the "Valet" button/switch three times, then release it. You must complete this step within ten seconds. You will hear the system chirp once, meaning that you are now programming channel 1.

Press the "Lock" button on the remote within ten seconds of completing the last step. You will hear a long chirp coming from the alarm's siren. Your may repeat this for up to three additional remotes that you wish to program.

Press the "Valet" button/switch once again, then release it within ten seconds of completing the last step. Two chirping sounds will be heard, indicating that channel 2 has been accessed.

Press any of the other buttons on the remote that you wish to control the "Unlock/Disarm" feature with. Continue holding the button until another long chirp is heard. Repeat this for up to three additional remotes as well. If you plan to program the same button on the remote to control the "Lock/Unlock" feature, skip this step, for channel 1 programming will control both with the single button.

Press the "Valet" button/switch once more, then release it. This will bring you into the channel 3 programming mode.

Press within ten seconds any of the unused buttons on the remote that you wish to program with the "Truck Release" feature, then release it when you hear the long chirp. Repeat for up to three additional remotes.

Press the "Valet" button/switch once more within ten seconds of completing the last step. You will hear a set of four chirps, indicating that channel 4 has been accessed.

Press within ten seconds any of the un-programmed buttons on the remote that you wish to program the "Auxiliary Input" feature to, until you hear a long chirp. Repeat for any additional remotes that you are programming.

Push the "Valet" button/switch to enter the channel 5 programming mode within ten seconds of completing the last step, then release it. Five chirps will now be heard.

Press any of the other buttons on the remote that you wish to program the "Auxiliary input 2" feature to until another long chirp is heard coming from the siren. Repeat this for any additional remotes.

Press the "Valet" button/switch once again, and wait for the six chirps to indicate that channel 6 has been accessed.

Press the "Unlock" button (or any button that is not yet programmed) to control the "Driver 1 Priority" feature, then release it. Do this for any additional remotes that you wish to have the same configuration.

Press and release the "Valet" button/switch one more time. You will now hear seven chirps coming from the siren, meaning that channel 7 is now being programmed.

Press the "Unlock" button (or any unused button) and hold it until a long chirp is heard. This will program the remote to control the "Driver 2 priority" feature. Repeat for any other remotes that you wish to have the same configuration.

Tip

  • check You can program channels 6 and 7 to control other features than just the driver priority. Programming any of the buttons other than "Unlock" will allow you to control these outputs.

Items you will need

About the Author

Based in Florida, Robert Ceville has been writing electronics-based articles since 2009. He has experience as a professional electronic instrument technician and writes primarily online, focusing on topics in electronics, sound design and herbal alternatives to modern medicine. He is pursuing an Associate of Science in information technology from Florida State College of Jacksonville.

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