How to Make Timesheets With Google Docs

by Christina Hadley ; Updated August 30, 2017

Creating a time sheet in Google Docs is much like using Microsoft Excel, except that you can make it and update it from any web browser. Use the Weekly Time Sheet template to cut down the amount of time it normally takes to make one from scratch.

Sign into docs.google.com and click the "Menu" icon in the upper-right corner and select "Sheets." If you don't see a list of templates, click the "Menu" icon again, select "Settings" and then enable the enable the "Display recent templates on home screens" option. Click the "Template Gallery" menu to expand the list of templates.

Scroll down to the Work section and click the "Weekly Time Sheet." The time sheet opens as a new Google Sheet.

Personalize the timesheet template by typing in details such as a title for the timesheet and a date range.

Customize the timesheet template as necessary. Click the "Edit" option within any timesheet template field to alter the template's heading text, or, use the "Duplicate" button to insert a copy of an appealing section into the same timesheet. You may also eliminate sections that don't apply to your business by clicking the section's "Trash" icon.

Use the "Add Item" drop-down menu to enhance the timesheet template with form elements such as check boxes, multiple choice question fields and text areas. Consider inserting a multiple choice section to indicate if the time being recorded on the timesheet is overtime, volunteer time, training time or regular paid time.

Choose a theme for your timesheet to add background images and graphics. Your options include design elements that are suitable for non-profit organizations, educational institutions and small businesses. Click "Apply" after you find a graphic treatment that you like.

Click "Done," which resides at the bottom of the new Google Doc, to publish the timesheet or send it to others by clicking the "Email This Form" button.

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About the Author

Christina Hadley holds a Bachelor of Arts in design. She writes copy for an assortment of industries. Her work also appears in the "Houston Chronicle" small business section. Hadley is a UCLA-certified computer professional. The British Museum recently featured one of her digital images in an exhibit.