How to Fix a Dead Laptop Battery

by Jacob Stover

Laptop computers are valued for their portability and usefulness on the go, but a failing battery can quickly strip the device from any sort of portability or extended usefulness. Unfortunately, like all rechargeable batteries, your laptop's battery will lose its ability to hold a charge over time and repeated use. Eventually a battery that could once last for 5 to 6 hours may only be able to hold a charge of twenty minutes or so. There are a few options for squeezing more life out of your batteries, though eventually your best option may simply be to replace them.

Modifying your Existing Battery

1

Remove the battery from the back of your laptop.

2

Open up the battery by carefully unscrewing any screws found on the casing.

3

Locate the small lithium-ion battery cells inside. They should be about the same size as a double-A battery. These are the cells that provide the power to your computer. Over time, the chemicals in these batteries become less efficient at conducting electricity as a result of repeatedly receiving and discharging an electrical current. Carefully remove these batteries, taking note of their voltage.

4

Locate a suitable vendor for replacement lithium-ion cells. You may choose cells of a higher milliamp rating for increased battery life, but remember that the batteries must be of the same size and voltage.

5

Remove the old cells from the battery, and place the new cells in the same casing. Ensure that the battery polarity is the same as the old cells.

6

Solder the new cells to the connective wiring of the battery. Use caution when soldering these cells, as it is possible for batteries to explode when exposed to high heat, or when their casing is ruptured. Once the cells are properly soldered, you may close up the casing of the battery. If this procedure is performed correctly, the battery should now function like new. Consult the "Laptop Battery Hack" video in the resources section for more information.

Warning

  • Always wear safety goggles when using a soldering iron.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jacob Stover is a writer and editor from Ann Arbor. He has been writing professionally since 2009. His work has been published in the "Wayne State University Literary Review." He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and film studies from Wayne State University.

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