How to Fix Corrupted Windows

by Alan Okpechi

Microsoft Windows operating systems such as Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 were created with software stability in mind. System errors, freezes and crashes can be common in some Windows-based machines. Windows operating system manages dozens of programs, utilities and applications interacting with themselves. User-generated changes or the interference of malicious software like spyware and viruses can make a Windows operating system unstable. Corrupted files are unreadable and are not able to be used by a Windows operating system. Microsoft does allow for a feature called "System Restore" to fix corruption errors.

Windows XP Instructions

Click "Start," then "Control Panel" and double-click "Performance and Maintenance."

Double-click "System" in the "Performance and Maintenance" window. Click "System Restore."

Click "Restore my computer to an earlier time," and then click "Next."

Choose a date from the list of restore dates and click "Next." Click "Next" again to confirm your choice of date.

Click "OK" to confirm your choices and to begin System Restore.

Windows Vista Instructions

Click "Start." Select the "Start Search" tab and type in "systempropertiesprotection," then press "Enter."

Select "System Protection," then "System Restore."

Select "Choose a different Restore Point" and click "Next."

Choose a date before the point of Windows corruption and select "Next" both times it appears.

Click "OK" to confirm your choices and to begin System Restore.

Windows 7 Instructions

Click "Start." Type "System Restore" and press "Enter."

Click "Choose a different Restore Point" and select "Next."

Select a date on the list of restore points for a time before the Windows file corruption.

Click "Next" both times it appears.

Click "OK" to confirm your choices and to begin System Restore.

Tip

  • check Back up any important files before making any changes to your hard drive.

About the Author

Alan Okpechi has been a freelance writer since 2008 and writes for companies and websites like eHow. Okpechi specializes in health-related topics, drawing from his Bachelor of Arts in both biology and English from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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