How to Fix an Audio Driver in Windows XP

by Kefa Olang

In Windows XP, audio drivers are software programs that enable your sound hardware to communicate with your computer so that you can hear sound. Occasionally, audio drivers may run into errors, which diminish sound performance or disable it completely. These problems are caused by many different factors including improper updates, and interference from other programs. With a few troubleshooting steps, fix your audio driver in minutes.

1

Try connecting another sound device to your computer. For example, connect a different set of speakers to your computer.

2

Click the Windows "Start" button if you cannot hear any sound after connecting another sound device to your computer. Click "Help and Support" and click the "Games, sound and video problems" option. Click "Sound Troubleshooter." The sound repair wizard launches. Select the option that explains the sound problems that you are experiencing with your audio driver and click "Next." Follow the guided prompts.

3

Reinstall or update your media player that you are using if the "Sound Troubleshooter" did not repair your audio driver. Refer to your media player softwares documentation if you are unsure how to update your program.

4

Update your audio driver. To do so, click the Windows "Start" button if you are still having sound problems and click "Run." Type "dxdiag" (without quotes) and press "Enter."Click the "Sound" tab. Locate the "Device" section. Look for your audio driver's name and provider and write the information down. Click "Exit."

5

Go to your audio driver manufacturers websites and locate the downloads section. Using the information that you wrote down, select the latest audio driver update and download it to your computer.

About the Author

Kefa Olang has been writing articles online since April 2009. He has been published in the "Celebration of Young Poets" and has an associate degree in communication and media arts from Dutchess Community College, and a bachelor's degree in broadcasting and mass communication from the State University of New York, Oswego.

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