How to View a File With a PS Extension on a Windows Computer

by Will Conley

The ".ps" file extension can be one of three things: an Adobe PostScript file, an ACDSee Photo Manager 2009 file, or a Microsoft Works-related file. To view a ".ps" file, you will find out which of these three types of ".ps" files it is, and then determine which Windows-compatible programs can open it. You will then download the appropriate program if you do not already have it (see the Resources section), and open the file in that program (see the Tips section). The process is easy if you follow this guide.

1

Determine whether the file whose extension is ".ps" is an Adobe PostScript file, an ACDSee file or a Microsoft Works-related file. It is probably an Adobe PostScript file, because ACDSee is not a mainstream program, and Microsoft ceased production of Works in 2010. To determine which program to use, right-click the file in question and select "Properties" from the context dialog. Look under the "General" tab next to where it says "Type of file." If "Adobe" appears in the formal file type title, it is a PostScript file. If "ACDSee" appears there, it is an ACDSee Photo manager 2009 file. If "Microsoft" appears there, it is a Works-associated file.

2

If the file whose extension is ".ps" is a PostScript file, open and view it in Adobe Illustrator CS4, Adobe Acrobat 9 Pro or Adobe Photoshop CS4. See the Resources section to download those programs. You can also open a .ps file in any printer program that supports the PostScript format.

3

If the file is an ACDSee Photo Manager 2009 file, open and view it in ACDSee Photo Manager 2009. See the Resources section to download that program.

4

If the file is a Microsoft Works-related file, open it in Microsoft Works. See the Resources section to download that program.

Tip

  • To open any file in a program of your choosing in Windows, right-click the file wherever it appears in the folder navigation system on your hard drive and select "Open with..." Click "Browse" and select the program from the list that appears.

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About the Author

Will Conley's writing has appeared in print and online since 1999. Publication venues include Salon.com, SlashGear.com, National Journal, Art New England, Pulse of the Twin Cities, Minnesota Daily and ThisBlogRules.com. Will studied journalism at the University of Minnesota. He is working on four fiction and nonfiction books.

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