How to Figure Out the Password for Your Phone

by April Khan

Most handsets come with the option of adding a security passcode to protect your phone from being used without authorization. This same security passcode can be set to certain aspects of the phones such as safeguarding your text messages, your pictures or your phone book. And without the security passcode you will not be able to enter your handset or look in the guarded areas of your phone. If you have misplaced your password or forgotten it, there are ways to retrieve it.

Consult your user manual. In the user manual for your handset there will be a section called phone lock; this should be located under the security options. The generic code from OS handsets is "0000" or "1234," depending on the make and model your security passcode maybe six digits.

Call your service provider. If you've changed your security passcode and now cannot get in the phone, it is important to call your service provider to get a bypass code. Do this before entering the passcode the third time. Once you have entered the passcode incorrectly three times, you will be permanently locked out of your handset.

Go into a mobile phone shop and explain to them you locked yourself out of your handset. In most cases, they will have a code that overrides your security code or software that can reset it. In worse-case scenarios your phone may have to be restored back to factory settings.

Tips

  • check As of 2010, many of the newer phones have security codes. These codes keep your handset safe in the case that his lost or stolen. It is a good idea to immediately change the generic security code as soon as you receive your handset. If your phone is lost or stolen even with the personalize security code, call your phone company immediately to report the loss.
  • check If you are locked out of your phone because the key lock came on, the consult your user manual on how to remove the key lock. All handsets are different, although on many the keylock is a button on the perimeter of the phone.

Warning

  • close Do not give your personalized or generic security passcode to anyone. You will be responsible for any unauthorized calls made from your handset.

About the Author

April Khan is a medical journalist who began writing in 2005. She has contributed to publications such as "BBC Focus." In 2012, Khan received her Doctor of Public Health from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She also holds an Associate of Arts from the Art Institute of Dallas and a Master of Science in international health from University College London.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera black cell phone image by timur1970 from Fotolia.com