How to Enable JavaScript & Install Adobe Flash 9

by John Smith

If you come across a blank square space on a web page, chance are you don't have Adobe Flash installed to be able to view the content. Many websites use Flash software for playing interactive media, such as videos or gaming. The software is free, but you need to have another software program---JavaScript---enabled to be able to download Flash. JavaScript is a programming language that all computers can read. If JavaScript is disabled or blocked, you can manually enable it and download the Adobe Flash program online.

In Internet Explorer, click on the "Tools" tab on the main menu bar and select "Internet Options."

Click the "Security" tab and select "Custom Level."

Scroll down under the "Security Settings--Internet Zone" pop-up and find the "Scripting" options. Under "Active Scripting," click "Enable." Click "OK" to save and exit.

In Firefox, click on "Tools," "Options," then select the "Content" tab. Click on the box next to "Enable JavaScript."

In Opera, click "Tools," "Preferences," and select the "Advanced" tab. Under "Content," check the "Enable JavaScript" box and click "OK" to save settings.

Go to the Adobe Flash download page (see Resources). You can also access the Flash install page while browsing online. Some content pages that can't display will provide a "Get the Latest Flash Player" link. Click on this link to go to the Adobe Flash download page.

Click on "Agree and Install Now" and select "Install" from the security pop-up box. It should install automatically (you will need to restart your browser when the install is complete).

Some browser versions will download the install file to your hard drive (Mac OS X). In that case, double-click on the downloaded file and let the program install.

Go to the Adobe Archived Flash Player page to get older versions of the Flash player (see Resources). You can save any older installation file to your computer, such as version 9 or below. Note that if you download an older version of Flash, some content might not work properly (as of April 2010, the most current Flash version is 10).

About the Author

John Smith began writing back in 2003. Smith is a technology writer currently living in Lansing, Mich. His articles have appeared in online publications including PC World and IGN, where he specializes in mobile apps for both Android and iOS.

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