How to Download Music to a PC

by Charlie Yin

Instead of selling physical copies of their records, many bands release their music exclusively online. With the advent of the Internet, as of 2010, more songs are being sold via websites. Online stores such as iTunes and Napster are replacing traditional record stores. Downloading music online also can be free, provided that you know where to look. Keep in mind that downloading copyrighted material without permission is illegal, so make sure that you have approval to download before doing so.

Downloading Music to Your Computer

1

Subscribe to a music downloading service. Some services are "pay as you download" sites, like iTunes, where each song is typically 99 cents as of 2010. Other services allow you to pay a monthly fee in order to download a certain number of songs each month, such as Napster. Downloading songs depends on the service that you are using. In iTunes, select the "iTunes Store" from the navigation bar on your left side. Search for a song that you want and click the "Buy" button to the right of the song.

2

Visit music blogs. Music blogs will often post an MP3 that you may download for free in order to preview a certain up-and-coming band. You can read the blog post to see whether or not you would be interested in the MP3. In order to save the song, right click the song link. In the context menu, click "Save Target As...". Browse to where you want to save the file on your hard drive and then click the "Save" button. Make sure you have permission to download the song, if it is under copyright.

3

Visit an artists official page or Myspace. Oftentimes, artists release songs for free in order to promote a new or upcoming album. To download the song, right click on the link that the band provides and click "Save as..". Browse to a location on your hard drive and click the "Save" button.

4

To open an MP3 file that you have downloaded, you need a media player program. A good media player for windows is Winamp. Simply double click an MP3 file and it will automatically start playing in Winamp, as long as Winamp is made your default media player.

Items you will need

About the Author

Charlie Yin has been writing since 2006. He has written for the University of California-Berkeley's newsletter, "The Daily Cal," publishing album reviews for upcoming bands. Currently, Yin is working toward a Bachelor of Arts in English at the University of California-Berkeley.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera mp3 hand image by giovanni cardinali from Fotolia.com