How Do I Access Email from Anywhere?

by Emma Watkins

If you use an email client, such as Outlook or Mail, to retrieve your messages, you may not know that you can access them from anywhere. As long as you have a Web-based email account and either a computer or a mobile device with an online connection, there's no reason for you to be cut off from the world, no matter where you go.

Create a Web-based email account. Also known as Webmail, Web-based email lets you access your messages using a Web browser. It also eliminates the need for you to download email client software to your computer. Some popular Webmail providers are Yahoo!, Hotmail and Gmail.

Get an Internet-ready mobile device. You have two options for accessing your messages. If you'd like to download them to your device (e. g. Blackberry, Smart Phone), configure its e-mail client to receive your POP mail. POP stands for "Post Office Protocol" and allows you to download messages from your Internet Service Provider's server. Another choice you have is to simply launch your Web browser in your mobile device, navigate to your Webmail provider's website, log on to your account and read your messages online.

Use Mail2Web. This service doesn't require you to have an email account with it. Once on the website (mail2web.com), type your complete email address and password in the appropriate boxes. Click on the "Check mail" button.

Locate an Internet café. These are public-access places, which may or may not serve coffee, outfitted with computers connected to the Internet. For a fee, you'll get access to one of their machines and be able to check your messages.

Find a library. Nowadays, many libraries have computers connected to the Internet. While some may only allow patrons to log in using their library card number, you may find one (especially in tourist areas) that give temporary access to out-of-town visitors.

Travel with your laptop. If you take your own computer with you, as long as it has a wireless adapter, you can get your email at airports, coffee shops, and hotels. But some of these places may charge you a fee before you can tap into their online connections.

Ask at the hotel desk. Often hotels have a designated office with a computer, fax and telephone for guests to use. The fees tend to be hefty, but in a pinch, they may be worth it.

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About the Author

Emma Watkins writes on finance, fitness and gardening. Her articles and essays have appeared in "Writer's Digest," "The Writer," "From House to Home," "Big Apple Parent" and other online and print venues. Watkins holds a Master of Arts in psychology.

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