How to Copy a Video From Facebook & Send It to Someone Else

by Leah Waldron-Gross

Sharing a video clip is one of the simplest ways to brighten an email box or mobile device screen -- but deciphering how to copy the video can be frustrating, especially if the video is not your own. If you find a Facebook video worth sharing, the rest is solved with Facebook's integrated video sharing features.

Facebook Sharing

The simplest method to share a Facebook video is to hover your cursor over the video and click the "Share" link beneath the video, which posts the video to your own Timeline, a friend's Timeline, or in a personal Facebook message. However, Facebook videos can be sent outside of the Facebook realm, even if the recipient doesn't have a Facebook account.

Emailing Facebook Videos

Emailing a Facebook video requires a URL link, but Facebook simplifies this process. To find the URL, mouse over the video and click "Send" at the bottom of the screen, which opens a new email window. Type in the recipient's email address, add an optional message, and click "Send message" to share the full video via email. Alternatively, you can copy the URL link and manually paste it into the body of an outgoing email.

Embedding Facebook Videos

To share the Facebook video with as many people as possible, consider embedding the video on your own website or on another social media site, such as Reddit or Tumblr. To find the embed code, mouse over the video and select "Options" at the bottom of the page. Choose "Embed code" in the drop-down menu, which opens a window with the embed code link. Copy the link and paste it on your personal website. Depending on the website, you may need to paste the code in a status update or post box.

Tips and Considerations

If the video you're copying was created by a friend, ask the friend's permission before sharing the video online. Some Facebook videos may contain copyright information, particularly if the video is an advertisement, TV or movie clip. You can send or share a copyrighted video via Facebook or email, but you may come across legal issues if you embed a video on your personal website. This is more dangerous if you intend to use the video for financial gain. You don't have to pause the video to share, send or embed.

About the Author

Leah Waldron is the head of Traveler Services at First Abroad, a gap year travel company based in Boston and London. As a travel, research and LGBT news writer, Waldron has publication credit on magazines and newspapers including "Curve Magazine," "USA Today," "The Sun Sentinel" and the "The Houston Chronicle." Waldron has a bachelor's and master's degree in creative writing from Florida State University.

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