How to Convert MP3 File to Website Link

by Danielle Fernandez

Adding MP3s of music and other audio elements to your website enhances the content for site visitors. Whether your aim is to add instructional how-to files or to post a background soundtrack, the files can be programmed to automatically stream at page launch or can simply be clicked for access. To link them, upload the MP3s to your host server, then program the linked location within your site's HTML code.

Links to MP3s

When you link an MP3 on your site, your visitors can access it in two ways. First, they can click it as they would any other link, which prompts their default media player to open and start streaming the audio. Otherwise, they can choose to save the linked MP3 by either right-clicking and selecting "Save Target As" or, on a Mac mouse that doesn't have two buttons, hitting the "Ctrl" key as you click.

How to Convert to Links

To make them into links, upload your MP3 files to the site's host server and take note of their location. For example, if you've saved MySong.mp3 in the "Music" folder on your MySite.com host server, your resulting link would be "http://www.MySite.com/Music/MyTune.mp3." Basic HTML coding is required to display the link on your page. Locate a page's HTML file or create a new one in your favorite text editor and paste "<a href="Music/MyTune.mp3">Click here to play my song.</a>" (without the quotation marks) at the location you'd like it to appear.

Upload Using Online Storage

If you don't have access to a site's host server, you can take advantage of sites offering free online storage. Google Drive, for example, allows you to upload up to 15 GB of data to an account stemming off your Google logins. Choose to "Share" the file to obtain a Web link to use in the HTML code you'll develop.

Warnings

Any time you create a link from an MP3 file to publish on a site, consider copyright laws and avoid posting licensed music, even if you've purchased it from a legitimate source. Visitors can download your MP3 files by clicking on a simple HTML link, so either avoid posting these types of files or consider embedding Flash-enabled playlists that prohibit download instead. Copyrighted music is only appropriate for sharing as a Web link on your site when you've received express permission from the copyright owner to do so.

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About the Author

Based in Tampa, Fla., Danielle Fernandez been writing, editing and illustrating all things technology, lifestyle and education since 1999. Her work has appeared in the Tampa Tribune, Working Mother magazine, and a variety of technical publications, including BICSI's "Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual." Fernandez holds a bachelor's degree in English from the University of South Florida.

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