How to Convert Fonts to Swf

by Eric Fenton

Exciting fonts can change a boring website into an eye-catching one, but HTML requires that any fonts you use when creating a website are already installed on your visitors' computers. One of the best ways to make sure that all your users see the exact same exciting site is by converting your fonts to Flash, otherwise known as a .swf file type.

How to Convert Fonts to SWF

Download sIFR Font Maker, a free program that converts true-type fonts to Flash fonts, also known as SWF fonts. The link is located in the Resources section below. Install the software and open the program.

Locate the True-Type font that you would like to convert on your computer. Click the Browse button in the program to find the regular font (not bold or italic). The file should have an extension TTF.

If there are italic or bold versions of the font you are trying to convert, use the Browse button next to these optional boxes and locate the True-Type fonts for those styles.

Select the characters you want to convert. It's easiest to use the "All" button to the right of the box to convert every character in the True-Type font, but this may increase the file size of your Flash font. If file size is a concern, you may want to select the "Basic" button or select "User defined" and enter only the characters you will use on your website into the box.

Select your target by clicking the "Save as..." button. Select the location on your local computer where you would like to save the SWF file. Once the program has finished running, your font will be ready to use!

Tip

  • You can use a program like Microsoft Word to look through the fonts that are installed on your computer and check if there are bold or italic versions you'd like to convert as well.

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About the Author

Eric Fenton has been writing for journalistic and scientific publications since 2005. He has previously written for "The Pen," where he was the opinion editor. He now works as a copy editor for the "News-Letter." He is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in biomedical engineering from Johns Hopkins University.

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