How to Change Your NAT Type on Verizon Routers

by Patrick Nelson

Verizon's FIOS fiber-optic broadband Internet service commonly uses Actiontec routers that are branded with the Verizon logo. One example of this is the MI424WR that also handles Wi-Fi wireless Internet connections. The router's security can be configured by the user including Network Address Translation (or NAT). NAT translates IP addresses to a valid public address on the Internet. This adds security because IP addresses of devices on the network aren't sent over the Internet. You can change the type of NAT to static.

1

Open the router's interface by entering the router's IP address in a Web browser. Then enter the User ID and Password. Choose "Advanced" from the "Routing" drop-down. Select the Routing Mode. Choose "NAT" only if the local network consists of a single device. Collisions will occur if more than one device tries to communicate with the same port.

2

Buy a block of static IP addresses from Verizon and choose "Static NAT" from the "Security" screen and the "Static NAT" screen will appear. Click "Add" and the "Add Static NAT" dialog will show up. Enter the name of the computer to be used as local host, or enter a specific IP address by selecting "Specify Address" from the "Networked Computer/Device" drop-down. Then enter the IP address.

3

Enter a public IP address from the block Verizon assigned to you in the "Public IP" text box and then select a connection from the "WAN Connection Type" drop-down. Select the protocol that you want accessible from the public IP address by setting the "Enable Port Forwarding for Static NAT" check box, choosing a protocol from the drop-down and clicking "OK" twice.

4

Repeat the previous step to add more static IP addresses.

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About the Author

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.

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