Android Won't Leave Airplane Mode

by Brad Harris

While Airplane Mode will quickly disable your phone's wireless functions when taking a flight, issues can develop over time that cause this mode to persist even when toggled off. This leaves you unable to utilize your Android phone for calls, texts or emails until the problem has been resolved. Troubleshooting this issue is not difficult, but you should be prepared to exchange or replace your device if software solutions fail.

Phone Restart

If your Android device has been continuously running for several days or more, extraneous data can build up in its temporary memory that can cause issues to manifest. Shutting the phone down for 30 seconds and then turning it back on may resolve the Airplane Mode issue outright. Consider power cycling this way every day to prevent future problems from occurring.

Recent Apps

Recently downloaded applications are often the cause of unexpected phone behavior. Because applications share various services in the background, they can sometimes conflict in ways that spark frustrating issues. If the stuck Airplane Mode issue occurred after downloading and installing an application, try deleting the program and then power cycling your Android device. If the phone remains stuck in Airplane Mode, a device wipe may be unavoidable.

Master Reset

In cases where you're unable to resolve the software problems, you may need to perform a master reset on your Android phone. Although this process will destroy all data on the device, it will also install a new copy of the operating system. As long as the problem does not stem from hardware failure, this procedure should effectively resolve the Airplane Mode issue. On most Android devices, this can be accomplished by pressing "Menu," "Settings," "Privacy" and then "Factory Data Reset." Press "Reset Phone" and then tap "Erase Everything." Allow the process to complete and then confirm that the Airplane Mode has returned to normal operation.

Hardware Failure

If Airplane Mode continues to stick, the problem may be caused by internal hardware failures. Call your wireless service provider to discuss next steps. You may be able to exchange your device under warranty or obtain a discount on a new one.

About the Author

Since 1999 Brad Harris has written on a wide array of subjects, ranging from helpful how-to articles about maneuvering through life to sharing war stories from navigating the campaign trail. Harris attended Michigan State University where he majored in political theory and has worked professionally in the telecommunications industry for over five years.