x

How to Write a Fax

by Angela BrownUpdated September 26, 2017
fax image by Attila Toro from Fotolia.com

While email and other forms of digital communication have overshadowed the fax in terms of popularity, many companies and individuals still send faxes. Faxes are especially useful when one is sending a signed document, when a digital file of a hard-copy document is not available and when senders or recipients do not have access to a computer or PDA. Once you've created a fax template, you can use it again and again.

Create a standard 8-1/2-by-11-inch word processing document with a horizontal text block across the top, two short columns beneath and a large text box beneath the columns.

Include your phone number, fax number and mailing address in the horizontal text block at the top of your document. Add your company logo, if applicable, in the left-hand corner of the horizontal block.

Add your recipient's name, company name if applicable, fax number and phone number in the left-hand column beneath your horizontal block. Also write "Re:" and include a subject for your fax (for example, "Today's Orders" or "July Sales Figures").

Write in your name, company name if applicable, fax number and phone number in the right-hand column. Include the number of pages, including the cover sheet, you are sending. Write in the date on which you are sending the fax. If you're sending the fax to additional individuals, add "CC:" and write down the name(s) of the recipient(s) and company names, if applicable.

Include any additional message you have for the recipient in the box at the bottom of the page.

Proofread your document for typos, misspellings and grammatical errors, as mistakes such as these can make you look unprofessional.

Items you will need

  • Computer with word processing program and printer

  • Pen

  • Paper

Tips

You can print out your cover sheet and write in your text, or you can type your information in your word processing document. The latter is preferable, as sometimes handwriting doesn't transmit as clearly as printed text.

More Articles