How to Get a Colored Nickname in a "Minecraft" Server

by William Lynch ; Updated September 22, 2017

For a game rooted in creativity, Minecraft can be pretty boring when it comes to player names. However, you can add some fun with a nickname plugin. Aside from granting you the ability to nickname yourself and other players, a nickname plugin also enables you to use special codes to display your nickname in up to 16 colors, adding some personality and signature style.

Download and install one of the numerous Minecraft nickname plugins. This article's Resource section provides links to three popular options.

Access the Minecraft command prompt. Type in the appropriate command to activate the nickname feature. This command may vary depending on your specific plugin, but the typical command is "/nick".

Insert a space after the "/nick" command. Type "&" followed by a number between 0 and 9 or a letter from a to f. This two-character combination is the code determining the nickname's color.

&0 black &1 dark blue &2 green &3 dark aqua &4 dark red &5 purple &6 gold &7 silver &8 dark gray &9 blue

&a green &b aqua &c red &d pink &e yellow &f white

Type your chosen nickname directly after the color code. For instance, the entire sequence should look like this: "/nick &5Nickname". This example code would show your name as "Nickname" and colored purple.

Press the "Return" or "Enter" button. Your Minecraft nickname should now display in the coded color.

Tip

  • Use color codes to differentiate your nickname from other players to make in-game conversations easier to follow.

    Color code opponents' nicknames to group them into certain categories, such as friends or rivals, to provide valuable information at a glance.

    You can use more than one color in your nickname. Simply add a new code for each desired color. For instance, the command "/nick &5Nick&6name" would produce a two-colored nickname, with the "Nick" in purple and the "name" in gold. You can even use a different color code for each letter. The command "/nick &1N&2i&3c&4k&5n&6a&7m&8e" would produce a rainbow effect.

About the Author

William Lynch has been a freelance writer for the past fifteen years, working for various web sites and publications. He is currently enrolled in a Master of Arts program in writing popular fiction at Seton Hill University. He hopes to one day become a mystery novelist.

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