How to Play Co-Op on "Jet Force Gemini"

by Mitch Reid ; Updated September 22, 2017

In “Jet Force Gemini” for the Nintendo 64, it’s your job to defeat Mizar, a giant insect with dreams of galactic domination. However, you don’t have to take on this task by yourself. The game features a two-player cooperative mode in which a second player assumes the role of Floyd, an armed and airborne robot. To access this two-player mode, you must retrieve Floyd’s missing parts on Tawfret.

Choose Tawfret from the game’s map screen.

Navigate through the stage until you find a courtyard that is free of enemy drones.

Climb onto one of the several stone structures that litter the area.

Jump from structure to structure until you find a robot’s head on a wooden post.

Talk to the head. He is Floyd, a robot that is willing to aid you in your quest if you collect his three missing pieces.

Leave the structure and walk over to the building with a circular window.

Climb onto the stone walkway that is to the left of the large building.

Pick up the first robot component, which is in plain sight atop the walkway.

Climb onto the top of the building.

Jump into the fireplace. You will land in an underground tunnel.

Follow the passageway until you find another robot component.

Exit the tunnel and return to the courtyard.

Locate the wide door behind one of the stone structures.

Destroy the door with an explosive. Keep your distance because the debris from the explosion can damage you.

Go inside the entrance and walk through the underground tunnel.

Pick up the robot component at the end of the tunnel.

Exit the tunnel and return to the courtyard.

Return to Floyd’s post. Talk to the robot to return his pieces. A second player can now control Floyd, who follows the main character around the map.

About the Author

Mitch Reid has been a writer since 2006. He holds a fine arts degree in creative writing, but has a persistent interest in social psychology. He loves train travel, writing fiction, and leaping out of planes. His written work has appeared on sites such as Synonym.com and GlobalPost, and he has served as an editor for ebook publisher Crescent Moon Press, as well as academic literary journals.