How to Make Your Sim Cry

by Daniel O'Hair ; Updated September 22, 2017

Players can make their Sims cry in "The Sims" by subjecting them to situations that leave them socially depressed or upset. This is done by "cheating" on a Sim, i.e., by having another Sim (whom the original Sim is in love with) make romantic gestures toward a third party. Your Sim will also cry if they are isolated from other Sims long enough to make their Social meter become very low. Crying Sims will often ignore player commands until their social needs are met.

Depression

Isolate your Sim by preventing all contact with other Sims. This is most easily done by having your Sim live alone and disallowing him from leaving the house or answering the phone.

Click on "Options" and un-check the "Free Will" option. This will prevent your Sims from making any actions without your command. Lonely Sims will automatically seek social interaction if they are allowed to have free will.

Wait until your Sim's Social meter becomes approximately one-fourth of its max value. Your Sim will automatically start crying and making gestures about being lonely.

Hurt Feelings/Jealousy

Make your Sim fall in love with another playable Sim by interacting with them until the "Flirt" option becomes available. The "Flirt" option becomes available after Sims have interacted in more formal ways such as talking. Select "Flirt" to make your Sim fall in love with the Sim he flirted with.

Have the Sim your original Sim is in love with begin interacting with a different Sim in front of the original Sim.

Select from the options "Hug," "Dance," "Flirt," or "Give Back Rub" once they become available. The original Sim will become jealous and confront the Sim who is getting attention by slapping or yelling at him. He will then cry and his Social meter will decrease considerably.

Tip

  • Cheer up hurt or jealous Sims by having them interact with other Sims.

Tip

  • Depressed Sims will have poor work performance, which can lead to their being fired.

About the Author

Daniel O'Hair began writing professionally in 2010. He served as an editor and reporter for various campus publications including the "Western Front," "Klipsun" and "The Planet" magazines. O'Hair has a Bachelor of Arts in news-editorial journalism from Western Washington University.