How to Repair an Amazon Kindle

by Bennett Gavrish ; Updated September 28, 2017

The Amazon Kindle is one of the most popular e-reader devices on the market, and as of 2010 it is available in two different sizes and in wi-fi and 3G versions. When using your Kindle, you might come across a wide variety of issues. No matter what type of problem you are facing, there are several basic troubleshooting methods you should follow to repair the issue before contacting Amazon's support team.

Connect the charging cable to the USB port on the bottom of your Kindle and then plug the other end of the cable into a working electrical outlet. You should see a brown light appear that indicates the Kindle's battery is charging. Many problems with the Kindle are due to low battery and can be repaired by letting the device charge.

Leave the Kindle plugged in to the charging cable until the light on the bottom of the device switches from brown to green, which indicates that the charging process has finished. Disconnect the Kindle from the charging cable and then try using the device again.

Pull the power switch on the top of the Kindle to the right and hold it in that position for 15 seconds. This action will reset and reboot your Kindle, which can often repair many internal problems with the device.

Make sure that wi-fi or 3G networking is enabled before trying to purchase a book or sync your Kindle. Press the "Menu" button and then use the navigation tool to select which type of networking you want to use. A wi-fi or 3G signal is required for all Kindle functions that involve data transfer or syncing.

Delete any books from your Kindle that are not operating properly and then sync your Kindle to download fresh copies of them. To sync your Kindle, press "Menu" and choose the "Check for New Items" option.

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About the Author

Bennett Gavrish is an I.T. professional who has been writing about computers, electronics and the Web since 2004. His work has appeared in the "Nashua Telegraph" and the "Daily Free Press" and on numerous websites. Gavrish received a bachelor's degree in journalism from Boston University.

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