Tracking a Cell Phone With a SIM Card Number

by Solange Belluz ; Updated September 28, 2017

A SIM (subscriber identification module) card is a memory chip that holds a variety of information pertaining to a cell phone, including text messages, the cell phone number and personal identity information. It allows a cell phone to get connected to a mobile network. The ability to use a SIM card with several phones--without having to contact a mobile network provider--makes it easier for thieves to use stolen phones by removing the current SIM card. However, the validation and encoding ability of a SIM card can help to stop your cell phone from being stolen and tack a lost or stolen cell phone.

Try calling your cell phone. The call will provide a way for your mobile service provider to track the last known location.

Locate your International Mobile Equipment Identity (IMEI) on the box in which your phone was delivered when you bought it. The IMEI number is used by the GSM network to identify valid devices, and therefore can be used for stopping a stolen phone from accessing a particular mobile network.

Contact your local mobile service provider and give it your account number and cell phone number. Ask your provider to furnish you with the SIM card number associated with your IMEI and cell phone number.

Ask your mobile service provider for assistance tracing the location of your SIM card. If your SIM card number no longer matches the phone number assigned to you or your IMEI, your mobile service provider will be able to trace the new cell phone number associated with the IMEI of your lost cell phone.

Contact your local police if you suspect your phone was stolen. Law enforcement is capable of blocking that mobile phone so that nobody can use it, or it can send SMS notification to your mobile phone if anyone turns it on with any SIM card.

Tip

  • Service providers across the globe can crosscheck the position of a cell phone using the IMEI number. However, this information is considered highly confidential and only in special cases is it revealed by the mobile service provider.

About the Author

Since 1987 Solange Belluz has been writing on faith, business and public policy, in French and English. She wrote for Lyon's guide "Le Petit Paumé" while attending EM Lyon in France. Belluz holds a Master of Divinity from Oral Roberts University, a Master of Arts in translation and a Master of Business Administration from York University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera sim card image by Stephen Gibson from Fotolia.com