How to Get Your Gamefly Games Quicker

by Melissa King ; Updated September 22, 2017

Purchasing video games for your Nintendo Wii, Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 can be expensive, costing you approximately $60 per title. Alternatively, for about $20 a month, the Gamefly rental service allows you to play as many games as you want for as long as you want. Gamefly has several shipping centers around the country, and depending on where you live, you may not receive games in the mail as fast as you would like. By using a few tricks, however, you can increase your chances of getting the games you want more quickly.

Search the rental games list for games that have not yet been released that you would like to play. Add all of the unreleased games you want to the top of your GameQ, in the order you want to receive them. If you have an unreleased game at the top of the GameQ for a long time, your chances of getting that game quicker increases.

Take your game to the post office when you are finished playing it. Ask the postal worker to scan the Fast Return bar code on the envelope. This information is sent to the Gamefly shipping center, and the next game in your GameQ is mailed to you immediately.

Keep no more than 10 games listed on your GameQ. If you only have a few games from which to choose, and you only keep games you really want to play on the GameQ, you have a good chance of receiving your desired game sooner.

Purchase a multi-game plan, allowing you to have two or more games out at a time. This allows you to get all of your games faster, because you do not have to wait for one game to return to Gamefly before another is mailed to you.

Move games with an "Available Now" status to the top of your GameQ. These games are ready to ship immediately.

About the Author

Melissa King began writing in 2001. She spent three years writing for her local newspaper, "The Colt," writing editorials, news stories, product reviews and entertainment pieces. She is also the owner and operator of Howbert Freelance Writing. King holds an Associate of Arts in communications from Tarrant County College.

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