Problems With Wii Remotes

by Johnny Kampis ; Updated September 22, 2017

Players use the Wii remote to both navigate menus and play games on the Nintendo Wii. The console's unique motion controls allow players to swing the remote to create actions on screen, such as wielding a sword, or striking a golf ball. Some common problems with the Wii remote can be rectified with simple troubleshooting procedures.

No Power

The Wii remote requires two AA batteries, inserted into the battery compartment, according to the diagram on the remote. Insert new batteries to see if they work, and look at the diagram to ensure you have the batteries inserted correctly.

Sticky Buttons

If liquids and other foreign objects contact the Wii remote, they can cause the buttons to stick. Remove residue from the Wii remote by dipping a clean toothbrush in hot tap water. Shake to remove excess water and then lightly scrub the buttons of the remote, working the bristles into the cracks. Let the remote dry for at least two hours before trying to operate it.

Wii Remote Works Erratically

This problem is likely caused by improper setup of the Wii sensor bar, which recognizes signals from the Wii remote and incorporates them into gameplay on the console. Place the sensor bar as far to the front of the TV top as possible, and use the included sensor bar stand if necessary. Operate the Wii remote from between three and eight feet from the TV for best results.

Remote and Wii Not Synchronized

You must sync the remote with your Wii console the first time you play, and any time after you sync the remote with a different console. Open the battery compartment on the remote and press the red button inside. Next, open the SD card slot on the front of the console and press the red button there.

References

About the Author

A veteran of the newspaper industry, Johnny Kampis has worked as a freelance writer since 2005. His articles have appeared in various publications including "The New York Times," "Atlanta-Journal Constitution" and the "San Francisco Chronicle." He currently serves as an editor of poker-based "Rounder" magazine and writer for the Alabama football publication "Crimson" magazine.