How to Print Photos With Captions

by Cece Evans ; Updated September 22, 2017

Items you will need

  • Computer

  • Photo image file

  • Microsoft Office suite (optional)

  • Printer

Text captions often play an important role in photographs. They define the image and tell the viewer exactly what he is looking at. For family albums and photographs taken long ago, captions provide important context. It's easy enough to forget the date, the event or the people within a photograph after many years, and a text caption can tell later viewers this information.

Instructions and Guidelines

Download the photograph to your computer, and give it a name you can remember. Save it to an area where you can find it easily, like on your Desktop or in the Documents folder.

Open Microsoft Office and select "New Blank Document." Go to the Insert menu and click on "Insert Picture." A window will open -- find your image, select it and click on "Open."

Arrange the photograph where you want it in the document, and adjust the size until it's at the proportions and scale you desire. Clicking on one of the corners and dragging it inwards or outwards is the best way to do this.

Go back to the Insert menu and select "Insert Text Box." Place the text box under the image and type in the caption. To change font, font size, color or other specifications, highlight the text and alter it as you would normal text in Microsoft Word.

Go to the File menu and select "Print." To preview the image you may also select "Print Preview" first.

Tip

  • Microsoft Office has slightly different formats for Macintosh computers and PCs , but the processes are basically the same.

    Captioning photos is also possible in PowerPoint, as well as non-Microsoft programs like OpenOffice, Photoshop, InDesign and others. Again, some of the steps are slightly different but not too hard to figure out.

About the Author

Cece Evans has worked as a professional writer and editor since 2008. She writes reviews and feature articles on contemporary art for a number of Texas-based and national publications such as the e-journal, ...might be good. Cece also works as a freelance editor and researcher. She holds a Master of Arts in art history from the University of Texas at Austin.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera dragon de mer image by Juliane from Fotolia.com