How to Set Up a New Gmail Address

by Matt McGew ; Updated September 28, 2017

Gmail is a free Web mail service from Google that allows you to send and receive email. Gmail features 5 gigabytes (GB) of storage and a patented search tool that allows you to easily search through and find individual emails. Setting up Gmail accounts is easy and there is no limit to the number of Gmail accounts that you are allowed to have. When you sign up for a Gmail account, you are also signing up for a Google account which will give you access to various Google products including iGoogle, Google Groups, Google Alerts, Google Product Search Shopping List and Personalized Search.

Open your Web browser and go to the Gmail website. Click the link "Create an account." Type the requested information in the appropriate fields. Check the availability of your desired log in name by clicking "Check Availability." If the user name you selected is not available, try another log in name. Gmail will also suggest alternative email addresses that are currently available. Click "I accept. Create my account."

Verify your telephone number. Gmail requires a telephone verification to help prevent spam and fraudulent use of Gmail's service. You can choose to receive a voice call from Google or a text message on your United States based cellular telephone. Type you telephone number and click "Send verification code to my mobile phone."

Check your mobile phone for your verification code or answer your telephone and write down the verification code given in the recorded message. Type the verification code in the text field labeled "Enter your code" and click "Verify."

Wait while Gmail sets up your new account. Click the button "Show me my account." You can now send and receive emails using your new Gmail account.

About the Author

Since 1992 Matt McGew has provided content for on and offline businesses and publications. Previous work has appeared in the "Los Angeles Times," Travelocity and "GQ Magazine." McGew specializes in search engine optimization and has a Master of Arts in journalism from New York University.

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