How to Add Bots to Counter-Strike 1.6

by Sam Orr ; Updated September 22, 2017

Counter-Strike is a prolific series developed from the source code of the Half-Life series made by Valve. Since its conception, it has become the most popular offshoot of the Half-Life engine. Counter-Strike, being a derivative of another game itself, is openly modified within the community, and easily accessible to changes for improved game play. One of the most common modifications to the game is the ability to add "bots" (computer-controlled nonplayable characters) to a match.

Go to the E[POD]bot website and click the "Downloads" tab on the left side of the page.

Download the latest version available on the website, which is located at the top of the page. Older versions appear in reverse order underneath the newest version. A "Version History" can be found by clicking the tab of the same name; the Version History explains the changes and improvements that have occurred over the program's development.

Open the .exe file from your browser after downloading it by double-clicking on its title. Choose a destination in the window that pops up, and save it to your desktop for convenience (or another folder or location on your computer).

Open the saved folder named "cstrike," which is at the destination you specified in step 2. Copy the three files (EPODBOT, liblist.gam, and titles) by highlighting them, right-clicking on any of them, and selecting "copy."

Open, in the following order: "My Computer," or simply, "Computer;" "OS (C:);" "Program Files;" "steam;" "steamapps;" "[your username];" "counter-strike;" "cstrike." The titles don't contain semicolons. Paste the three copied files from step 4 into the "cstrike" folder.

Choose "Yes" when asked to replace previous documents with the new files. Bots will appear automatically when running the game.

Tip

  • Press the "+/=" key on your keyboard to edit bot options in the game while a match is running.

About the Author

Sam Orr has been writing since 2006. Specializing in electronics, video games, music and home improvement, he writes for various online publications. Orr is studying physics at Ohio State University.