DIY TV Antenna Booster

by Marshal M. Rosenthal ; Updated September 28, 2017

Items you will need

  • Newspaper

  • Manila folder

  • Aluminum foil

  • Utility knife

  • Ruler

  • Cellophane tape

  • White glue

A television antenna is essential to watch over-the-air broadcasts. You can make an antenna booster that will improve the reception of an indoor antenna by concentrating the signals being received. Making the antenna booster requires supplies commonly found around the home. There is no chance of damaging your TV or the antenna by adding an antenna booster.

Place a sheet of newspaper on a table.

Unfold the manila folder. Place the manila folder on the newspaper with the long end facing you. Cut a 5-by-7-inch rectangle out of the manila folder with the utility knife.

Cover the 5-by-7-inch rectangle with aluminum foil. Tape the sides of the aluminum foil to the 5-by-7-inch rectangle with strips of cellophane tape. Turn the rectangle over. Repeat the procedure with the aluminum foil.

Draw a 5-by-7-inch rectangle on the manila folder. Draw a circle inside of the rectangle. Cut out the circle with the utility knife.

Cover the circle with aluminum foil. Tape the sides of the aluminum foil to the circle with strips of cellophane tape. Turn the circle over. Repeat the procedure with the aluminum foil.

Cut a 1-inch deep, 1/2-inch wide groove into the left and right sides of the circle with the utility knife. Fold the circle over into a tube so that the grooved sides are facing left and right. Tape the tube together using strips of cellophane tape.

Cut a hole through the top of the tube and out the bottom with the utility knife.

Bend the left and right sides of the rectangle inwards. Hold the sides in for 30 seconds.

Apply white glue to one side of the tube. Place the side of the tube that has the white glue horizontally onto the rectangle. Let the white glue set for an hour.

Place the tip of the indoor antenna through the hole in the bottom of the tube and out the top. Apply strips of cellophane tape to hold the antenna booster to the antenna.

Tip

  • Close proximity to a wireless home network can inhibit the reception abilities of the TV antenna.

About the Author

Marshal M. Rosenthal is a technology maven with more than 15 years of editorial experience. A graduate of Brooks Institute of Photography with a Bachelor of Arts in photographic arts, his editorial work has appeared both domestically as well as internationally in publications such as "Home Theater," "Electronic House," "eGear," "Computer and Video Games" and "Digitrends."