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How to Tell if an Xbox Is Modded

by Aaron Kopf ; Updated September 22, 2017

The Xbox 360 is a sophisticated gaming powerhouse. Some who are not satisfied with their console's factory settings resort to "modding." Modding, short for "modifying," encompasses any changes to the console hardware performed by the owner. In most circles, the word refers to adapting the firmware so that the console can read burned games. However, some modifications are used to combat the dreaded "Red Ring of Death" (RROD), the visual indication that there is something catastrophically wrong with the internal workings of the console. Regardless of the reasons for modding, follow this simple procedure to determine if your console was a victim of such adaptation.

Unplug all cords from your Xbox 360.

Turn your console upside down and look for a small notch in the faceplate.

Insert your finger into the notch and pull the bottom of the faceplate away from the console base. The faceplate is oftentimes solidly attached. Therefore, if you have a screwdriver or Xbox 360 console opening tool handy, use them to avoid injury to your finger.

Pull the upper section of the faceplate way with your fingers and set the faceplate aside.

Look toward the bottom of the console face. You should see a small, rectangular "Microsoft" sticker. This is the warranty sticker. If it is torn, the previous owner opened your console for modification.

If the previous owner sent their console into Microsoft for repairs, the technicians would have replaced the torn warranty sticker with a new one. A torn sticker always means consumer tampering.

Tip

  • Understand that if you decide to open the console for further investigation and tear the sticker, you will void your console's warranty.

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About the Author

Aaron Kopf graduated from the University of Central Arkansas with honors in 2009, holding a Bachelor of Arts in communication. While enjoying his time at college, Kopf was published in The Echo and Vortex magazine.

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