How to Do a Proposal in Powerpoint

by Tara Duggan ; Updated September 15, 2017

Business proposals (formally solicited, informally solicited or unsolicited) contain business planning information. You typically write a solicited proposals in response to established requirements, known as Requests for Proposals. RFPs provide detailed information about what your potential client wants to purchase from you. Creating a proposal using PowerPoint involves opening a new file, inserting new slides and adding text to describe your plans.

Open a new PowerPoint file.

On the title page, indicate the name of your project proposal, such as "Response to RFP #2544" and type your company name as the subtitle. Insert your company logo, if you have one.

Click the "New Slide" button and select the "Title and Content" layout. Click the top text box and enter "Introduction." Click the bottom text box and enter text that describes your company, including a mission statement.

Click the "New Slide" button and select the "Title and Content" layout. Click the top text box and enter "Project Summary." Click the bottom text box and enter text that describes your proposed project, identifying how you will fulfill the specifications. Provide statistics regarding past experience, if appropriate.

Click the "New Slide" button and select the "Title and Content" layout. Click the top text box and enter "Objectives." Click the bottom text box and enter the specific, measurable project objectives associated with your project. Describe how the objectives address the problems or opportunities. List the key benefits, beginning with the most important.

Click the "New Slide" button and select the "Title and Content" layout. Click the top text box and enter "Statement of Work." Click the bottom text box and enter the project timetable for each part of the project. Use a chart to show the budget and total investment.

Click the "New Slide" button and select the "Title and Content" layout. Click the top text box and enter "Quality Assurance." Click the bottom text box and list the evaluation methods you will use to ensure the process is a success.

Use the PowerPoint spelling tool to check your spelling.

Save your file.

Tip

  • Check with the potential client for templates they have built to receive RFPs. Clients often build the format in which they want to receive RFPs, to make comparisons easier.

References

About the Author

Tara Duggan is a Project Management Professional (PMP) specializing in knowledge management and instructional design. For over 25 years she has developed quality training materials for a variety of products and services supporting such companies as Digital Equipment Corporation, Compaq and HP. Her freelance work is published on various websites.