Children's Masquerade Party Games

by Isaiah David ; Updated September 22, 2017

Children's masquerade parties are a great opportunity for imaginative play. Children love playing dress up, and a mask is one of the best props of all. Behind a bright, sparkly Mardi Gras mask, a child can be anyone she wishes to be.

Mask Relay

The mask relay, from Kidzruleusa.com, is a great way to incorporate masquerade party props into a classic children's game. To begin this masquerade party game, divide the guests into two or more teams and have each team form a line. Give the front member of each line a mask that you don't mind having banged up a little. When the game starts, the child in the front row passes the mask over his head to the child behind him, who passes it behind him until it reaches the back row. That child runs to the front of the line and passes the mask again. This process continues until the first child to hold the mask is back at the front of the line. The first team to complete the whole relay wins.

Who Am I?

Who Am I? is a classic acting party game that is greatly improved by the anonymous nature of a children's masquerade party. The adult supervising the party should write a label describing a character for each child. The labels can either be occupations like "pirate," "superhero" and "explorer," or they can contain the names of fictional characters the children will recognize and admire. The adult then tapes one label onto each child's back. The children then treat each other as the character on the label without stating who the character is. The first child to correctly guess his character wins.

Who Are You?

"Who Are You?" is a masquerade game related to "Who Am I?" but with a twist. One child picks a character out of a hat. He then interacts with the other children as that character and they try to figure out who he is. He can't tell them, but he can say things that the character would say to try to give away his identity. When someone guesses who the character is, another child gets a turn. This children's game goes well paired with a scavenger hunt. After the children finish guessing each others' identities, they can go hunt for treasure as the characters they chose.

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About the Author

Isaiah David is a freelance writer and musician living in Portland, Ore. He has over five years experience as a professional writer and has been published on various online outlets. He holds a degree in creative writing from the University of Michigan.

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