How to Repair WMI on a Windows System

by Joshua Duvauchelle ; Updated September 28, 2017

Windows XP is a version of the Windows operating system released by software developer Microsoft in 2001. Since its release, Windows XP has been replaced by various reiterations of Windows. However, Windows XP remains popular among consumers. The Windows Management Infrastructure (WMI) assists in various utilitarian functions of the operating system, such as remote access. Learn how to repair WMI on a Windows XP system in order to add productivity to your computing experience.

Click the Start menu button in the lower left-hand corner of the Windows XP screen.

Select Run in the pop-up Start menu.

Type \"CMD.EXE\" (without quotation marks) in the dialog box that appears. Click OK. This launches the Windows XP Command Prompt window. If you are using a Windows XP installation that is modified by a service pack upgrade, type \"rundll32 wbemupgd, UpgradeRepository\" (without quotation marks) instead. This will automatically detect and repair a corrupted WMI installation. Close the window and restart your PC. If you are using a Windows XP installation that is not modified by a service pack, continue to Step 4.

Type \"net stop winmgmt\" (without quotation marks) and press the Enter key on your keyboard. This opens the Windows Management Infrastructure window and the source folder for the WMI data. Note the location of the folder on your hard drive. Its default location may differ per computer and Windows XP installation.

Click the Start menu and select My Computer. Double-click the C:\ partition on your hard drive. Navigate to the folder displayed in Step 4. Rename the folder to \"Repository.\" Close the window.

Return to the WMI dialog window in Step 4. Type \"net start winmgmt\" (without quotation marks) and press the Enter key on your keyboard. Type \"EXIT\" (without quotation marks) and press the Enter key on your keyboard. Close the dialog window, The WMI infrastructure has now been repaired on your Windows XP installation.

Tip

  • Your Windows XP WMI should rarely need repairing unless you run various system-intensive processes.

About the Author

Joshua Duvauchelle is a certified personal trainer and health journalist, relationships expert and gardening specialist. His articles and advice have appeared in dozens of magazines, including exercise workouts in Shape, relationship guides for Alive and lifestyle tips for Lifehacker. In his spare time, he enjoys yoga and urban patio gardening.