How to Stop Pop-Ups on Your Computer for Free

by Tricia Goss ; Updated September 15, 2017

Items you will need

  • Windows PC

  • Spyware removal program

  • Firewall program

Some pop-ups are genuine error messages or warnings, provided by Windows, your antivirus program or another trusted software application. Then there are legitimate pop-ups that prompt you to do something, such as a pop-up window on your email account requesting your login information. Then there are pop-ups that are not just annoying. They are sometimes embarrassing and often dangerous, caused by a spyware infection on your computer.

Use Internet Explorer's pop-up blocker. Open Internet Explorer and click "Tools" on the toolbar. Point to "Pop-Up Blocker" and then select "Turn On Pop-Up Blocker." If you receive a message asking if you are sure you want to turn on the pop-up blocker, click "Yes."

Use the pop-up blocker in Firefox. Click "Tools" and then click "Options." Select "Content" and then select the "Block Pop-up Windows" checkbox. Click "OK" to apply changes.

Update Windows on a regular basis. Visit the Windows Update website and search for any new available updates. Updating regularly ensures that your software contains up-to-date protection from spyware and malware.

Scan your computer for spyware and adware. These types of malware, or harmful software, are notorious for causing pop-ups. They can also damage connectivity files on your computer and steal personal information from you.

Make sure your firewall program is turned on. In most versions of Windows, you can check your firewall settings by going to the "Start" menu, clicking the "Control Panel" to open it, and selecting the "Security" option. A firewall will block many harmful programs, such as pop-up causing spyware, from reaching your computer.

Tip

  • Don't download anything unless you are 100% sure that it is safe. Many freeware and shareware programs contain spyware.

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About the Author

Tricia Goss' credits include Fitness Plus, Good News Tucson and Layover Magazine. She is certified in Microsoft application and served as the newsletter editor for OfficeUsers.org. She has also contributed to The Dollar Stretcher, Life Tips and Childcare Magazine.

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